Jump to content


Yellow tip ammo question


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 DaSOB

DaSOB

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 09 February 2010 - 08:38 AM

I saw a comment on another forum that Dominican yellow tip is unsafe and has been known to destroy .50's. I am looking at purchasing some yellow tip that is on links and I am very concerned about it.

Anyone enlighten me on this?

Thanks!!

#2 shadowfrog

shadowfrog

    Advanced Member

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPip
  • 123 posts

Posted 09 February 2010 - 09:09 AM

DaSOB
DO NOT under any circumstances have anything to do with Yellow tip ammo it runs from dangerously HOT even for an M-2 Machine gun to undercharged (squib), over-sized slugs , bad primers and even worse brass ,it is not even worth taking down for salvage of components in a word BAD JU-JU

i am a bit surprised that it is still around in any quantity

Edited by shadowfrog, 09 February 2010 - 09:11 AM.

shadowfrog

rarely seen some times heard
you will hear the slug wizz by then 4 seconds later you will hear the crack of the rifle if i miss and i rarely do

#3 DaSOB

DaSOB

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 09 February 2010 - 11:49 AM

Thanks, and DOUBLE thanks! I was on the verge of buying 44 rounds of it, not knowing about it's rep.

I hope to be sending the payment to the seller NLT Friday, so possibly within a week/10 days I'll have my new bad boy. I'll post pics when I get it.

Thanks again!!

#4 DaSOB

DaSOB

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 09 February 2010 - 02:14 PM

I did some googling on the yellow tip and found some additional info at http://www.outlawper...50_BMG_AMMO.htm

For example, I offer the Dominican Republic 50 BMG. A few large lots of 50 BMG Armor Piercing came into the US from the Dominican Republic for public sale. This ammo is identified with a yellow tip.

After a few mishaps from hot loaded rounds in the US, some of the ammo was inspected. The powder was found to have heavily degraded into smaller granules. Through investigation it was found that poor storage techniques in the hot steamy Dominican Republic caused the ammo, even the newer ammo, to get surface oxidization. The ammo was rusting away in its crates. To combat this they tumbled complete loaded rounds, which to remove the oxidization, repainted the tips and packaged it in better cans.

Many people who had large quantities of this ammo in the US broke down the ammo into components to try to salvage them with US surplus powder. Upon inspection many of the projectiles had no gas seal at the bullet base in the jackets. A poor attempt to swage them had been made, but some of the bullets jackets weren’t even long enough to swage.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users